Come scorre il fiume..

30th September 2014

Audio reblogged from Blogthoven

C.P.E. Bach, Fantasy in C major, Wq. 59 No. 6 (1784)


Christopher Hogwood, fortepiano (1976)

When playing this Fantasy (one of my favorites), with its jolting back-and-forth shifts of tempo and rhythm, I remember a passage from Tristram Shandy, Vol. 7 (‘Now this is the most puzzled skein of all…’), where Tristram, mid-journey between Auxerre and Lyons, talks about how he’s been multiplied in memory, because while writing that travelogue he’s reminded of another one of his selves who in another time is also traveling from Auxerre to Lyons — with his father and Uncle Toby. And so, as he says, he’s this moment in a post-chaise shattered into a thousand pieces, and also this moment sitting on the banks of the Garonne in a ‘handsome pavilion…rhapsodising all these affairs.’ Those alsos of memory, jarring and endlessly discursive, toss the narrator from story to story and time to time (there’s a pun I see now in La Jetée, the Marker film, whose central idea is just this: temporal displacement or time travel through memory).

What one loses in creating a musical piece according to this idea of rhapsodizing on feelings felt in places past, is the unified progression of a single feeling over the course of a piece: the Einheit der musikalischen Empfindung. And Emanuel Bach, especially in his later years, actively avoided this. Almost always he shoots clear of the Sestos extreme of sentimentality, but the other way is the Abydos of sensationalism. But at his best — as he is here — he’s capable of bringing something to music that I’d only seen in literature: selfhood’s multiplicity, its endlessly strange recurrences, as seen through memory’s eye.

For all we know he could have read Sterne — he was immensely popular in Germany in the 1770s, in the Bode translation, and Bach was a good friend of Lessing and Moses Mendelssohn, and active in literary circles. But if he didn’t, there are some experimental aspects of his style that remind me of Tristram Shandy. (Think also of the many little mid-story interruptions, from Uncle Toby, Trim, Susannah, Dr. Slop, and the narrator himself.) 

source: homilius:

Playcount: 275

30th September 2014

Audio reblogged from daniel8056

Shape of My Heart

Jazz Fantasy

Every Breath We Take

source: kinoaida:

Playcount: 337

30th September 2014

Audio reblogged from Syng's Tumblr

I remember driving to this song last night, never remembering hearing it before. Everything around me became still, and I was at ease.

via boomboombip:

Playcount: 87

30th September 2014

Audio reblogged from daniel8056

Johann Sebastian Bach, Siciliana BWV 1031

Wilhelm Kempff, piano

source: hannibalsmusic:

(Source: kinoaida)

Playcount: 1,054

30th September 2014

Audio reblogged from grooviejazz

'Nocturne in F Minor, Op. 55, No. 1' by Chad Lawson, Judy Kang & Rubin Kodheli [The Chopin Variations, 2014]

via grooviejazz:

Playcount: 340

29th September 2014

Photo reblogged from a place to love dogs

Ha ak Ha ak!
Adorable long haired mini Dachshund puppy Gracie growing up. So so cute!

MillandGrace
Visit our poster store Rover99.com

source: aplacetolovedogs:

Ha ak Ha ak!

Adorable long haired mini Dachshund puppy Gracie growing up. So so cute!

MillandGrace

Visit our poster store Rover99.com

source: aplacetolovedogs:

29th September 2014

Audio reblogged from grooviejazz

'Pulling a Thread' by The Chamber Orchestra of London & Andrew Skeet [Kerry Muzzey: The Architect, 2014]

via grooviejazz:

Playcount: 196

29th September 2014

Audio reblogged from Blogthoven

Antonio Vivaldi - Cello Concerto in G minor, RV 416: 1. Allegro

The Academy of Ancient Music, Christopher Hogwood; Christophe Coin (cello)

Vivaldi wrote more than 500 concertos. About 350 of these are for solo instrument and strings, of which 230 are for violin, the others being for bassoon, cello, oboe, flute, viola d’amore, recorder, lute, or mandolin.
Vivaldi’s music was innovative. He brightened the formal and rhythmic structure of the concerto, in which he looked for harmonic contrasts and innovative melodies and themes; many of his compositions are flamboyantly, almost playfully, exuberant.

(linkiTunes - Spotify)

source: grindabod:

(Source: Wikipedia)

Playcount: 8,485

28th September 2014

Audio reblogged from daniel8056

" Melancholie For Solo Piano, FP.105 " By Composer Francis Poulenc (1899-1963) ~ Pascal Roge, Pianist

source: la-nero-maestro:

Playcount: 549

28th September 2014

Audio reblogged from box # 282

Debussy, Préludes - Canope

Gordon Fergus-Thompson, piano

source: hannibalsmusic:

Playcount: 2,461

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